Friday, September 23, 2016

Transference - from Kandinsky to Architecture to Digital Suprematism

A book Exploring Kandinsky, Architecture, and Suprematism. Shengyiyu Zhu and Italo Castella in collaboration. Buy paperback at Amazon or hardcover at Lulu

Kandinsky’s work of lines, shapes and colours was chosen as the premise for exploration and translation of art into an architecture language to be used and demonstrated in a dwelling project for a musician. Kandinsky’s very special form of abstraction derived from his understanding of music, free of things of nature and the past, but of things of the abstract which were forms of virtual creation derived from his subjective universe. As paintings should never be a copy of other things, not nature, not human, not everyday things, but of itself.

A two storey house of two geometrical shapes, one stable and another rotated, punctured by an axis from one into another and terminated on the outside with a subtraction in a two-dimensional circle. Planes of different shapes attached themselves to the axis, all miraculously anchors themselves with the line.

Using the three-dimensional model of the house, a virtual camera explores different angles with varying focal length, perspective and axonometric were generated with different shading of the model, such as wire frame, X-ray and hidden lines. At times the model is also sectioned to allow one to explore the inside of the model. Sectional planes could be vertical, horizontal or slanting. The lines also take on different forms, thin continuous or dash lines. 
With the captured images, certain areas were given weight with black fill or sometimes various greys. The images are presented with different layering, alternating between two-dimensional and three-dimensional. 
Through the digital medium, the final images started from the simple to complex interactions where the mind is no long able to grasp the initial simplicity of forms. It is led to trace and move from one line to another to another, pausing as the becomes shapes. Energy moves, pauses, explodes, coalesces, races, and dissipate in a geometrical landscape of transference between the two and three dimension.



Saturday, September 3, 2016

Portraits of Singapore with Antonio Berlusconi

One great book on the Art of Street Photography. It details how fun street photography can be done even with an inexpensive action cam, the Xiao Yi, from the same company that brings the Mi mobile. It makes street photography seems so easy, in fact, it is that easy, if one learn to strike a quick close rapport with strangers, and yes anyone can learn the skill, which the photographer has show in the book.
Simple text accompanies the each photograph and provides additional information that makes for an easy read. It is a leisure book that showcases Singapore's unique people and culture that most tourists would not have encountered. It shows the liveliness and spontaneity of the people in the multicultural Singapore. One would definitely feel the pulse and dynamism of Singapore's diversity.